Fallout from radioactive Fukushima rising in west coast waters

Aerial view of tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan ~ AP PHOTO/KYODO NEWS

Aerial view of tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan ~ AP PHOTO/KYODO NEWS

VANCOUVER _ Radioactivity from Japan’s crippled nuclear reactors has turned up off the British Columbia coast and the level will likely peak in waters off North America in the next year or two, says a Canadian-led team that’s intercepted the nuclear plume.

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Lubrication helps explain slow, silent earthquakes on B.C. coast

Slow quakes not felt in Vancouver. PHOTO: RICHARD LAM/PNG

Slow quakes not felt in Vancouver.
PHOTO: RICHARD LAM/PNG

Published: June 18, 2014

VANCOUVER — The “slow” quakes emanate from the deep like clockwork every 14 months on Canada’s west coast.

They typically release the energy of a Magnitude 7 earthquake, but the powerful tectonic events are almost imperceptible because they occur slowly over two weeks, instead of in sudden jolts that last just seconds.

“They would represent a pretty big earthquake if they happened like a regular quake, but because they are so slow you are never able to feel anything,” says Pascal Audet, a seismologist at the University of Ottawa, and  co-author of a report released Wednesday on the subtle, silent quakes. Continue reading

Pacific herring fishery was once sustainable over ‘millennia,’ study finds

Commercial herring catch PHOTO: POSTMEDIA NEWS/FILES

Commercial herring catch PHOTO: POSTMEDIA NEWS/FILES

Published: February 17, 2014

Hundreds of herring were hanging from the rafters of native long houses when Captain James Cook first sailed along the coast of British Columbia in the spring of 1778. And First Nations people can be seen smoking the small silver fish over fires in an arresting painting by John Webber, the artist on the Cook’s expedition.

Native legends and place names also provide plenty of evidence that herring were far more common historically than they are today.

Now a team of archeologists has weighed in with a report that further elevates the status of the lowly fish. Continue reading