Melting glaciers in Canada’s Arctic stoking sea-level rise

 

Researcher heading for a time-lapse camera  monitoring ice calving from the Belcher Glacier on  Devon Island, Nunavut. Photo ~ Alex Gardner

Researcher heading for a time-lapse camera monitoring ice calving from the Belcher Glacier on Devon Island, Nunavut.
Photo ~ Alex Gardner

May 16, 2013 _ The Laurentide ice sheet once entombed Canada in two kilometres of ice, but all that is left is a blob of ice on Baffin Island now shrinking at a remarkable rate.

A new study says glaciers around the world are contributing almost as much to the rise of the world’s oceans as the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets combined.

“And the largest contributor of all the regions is the Canadian Arctic,” says US glaciologist Alex Gardner, at Clark University, lead author the international study to be published Friday in the journal Science. Continue reading →

Conservative MP Slammed for ‘Appalling’ Polar Bear Letter

Polar bear ~ photo by Daniel J. Cox/Natural Exposures

Polar bear ~ photo by Daniel J. Cox/Natural Exposures

April 30, 2013 _ A Conservative MP has been peddling what researchers describe as “bogus” information on polar bears and citing U.S. climate skeptics as experts on the iconic creatures.

In a letter that shocked scientists, Yukon MP Ryan Leef said: “The global polar bear population has quadrupled over the last 40 years.”

The letter, which Leef wrote to a constituent in February, said many “pessimistic studies” about the bears have been judged “unscientific and inconsequential to decision makers” by U.S. researchers. The researchers he refers to are well-known climate skeptics.

Ian Stirling, a world authority on the bears at the University of Alberta, said he was shocked by Leef’s letter. Continue reading →

Arctic Ice “Rotten” to the North Pole, scientist says

Published: September 21, 2012

By Margaret Munro


NASA handout image shows how satellite data reveals how the new record low Arctic sea ice extent, from September 16, 2012, compares to the average minimum extent over the past 30 years (in yellow).
PHOTO: NASA/GODDARD

When David Barber first headed to the Arctic in the 1980s, the ice would typically retreat just a few a kilometres offshore by summer’s end.

Now he and his colleagues have to travel more than 1,000 kilometres north into the Beaufort Sea to even find the ice.

And it’s nothing like the thick, impenetrable ice of Arctic lore.

This year the ice is “rotten” practically all the way to the North Pole, says Barber, a veteran Arctic researcher and director of the Centre for Earth Observation Science at the University of Manitoba. Continue reading →