Tsunamis toss Japanese buoys and hard hats into B.C. forest

Scientist Lucinda Leonard sets up equipment to assess the way a 2012 tsunami inundated the old growth forest on Haida Gwaii, leaving behind plenty of seaweed and debris visible on the ground ~ NRCan Photo

Scientist Lucinda Leonard sets up equipment to assess the way a 2012 tsunami inundated the old growth forest on Haida Gwaii, leaving behind plenty of seaweed and debris visible on the ground ~ NRCan Photo

VANCOUVER _ Japanese hard hats and fishing floats are now lying in old growth forests on the British Columbia coast after being washed into the Pacific Ocean by the biggest tsunami of 2011, and then out of the Pacific by the largest tsunami of 2012.

But apart from the shared wreckage, the two tsunamis show just how different impacts of the giant waves can be. Continue reading

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Fallout from radioactive Fukushima rising in west coast waters

Aerial view of tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan ~ AP PHOTO/KYODO NEWS

Aerial view of tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan ~ AP PHOTO/KYODO NEWS

VANCOUVER _ Radioactivity from Japan’s crippled nuclear reactors has turned up off the British Columbia coast and the level will likely peak in waters off North America in the next year or two, says a Canadian-led team that’s intercepted the nuclear plume.

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‘Catastrophic’ quake and tsunami brewing off west coast

Pressure is building on seafloor off Vancouver Island and Pacific Rim National Park

Pressure is building on seafloor off Vancouver Island and Pacific Rim National Park

VICTORIA – The pressure has been building for more than 300 years. A giant slab of rock sliding in from the Pacific is exerting so much pressure on the west coast of North America it is warping Vancouver Island, tilting it higher and squeezing it a few centimetres eastward every year.

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Energy wells can ‘communicate’ and ‘sterilize’ the landscape Part 3: Trouble Beneath Our Feet

Canadian Natural Resources Limited workers cleaning up the bitumen spill in 2013 after it seeped up through a fissure at their Primrose oil sand projects north of Cold Lake. Alta. ~ Ed Kaiser/Edmonton Journal

Canadian Natural Resources Limited workers cleaning up the bitumen spill in 2013 after it seeped up through a fissure at their Primrose oil sand projects north of Cold Lake. Alta. ~ Ed Kaiser/Edmonton Journal

The sun was beginning to set on the farm near Innisfail, a two-hour drive south of Edmonton, when a wellhead suddenly started spewing oil and fracking fluids 20 metres into the air, coating the snowy field and trees in oily mist.

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Thermal wells point to ‘worst case’ leaks from the deep

Spring water from deep underground carries plenty of heat and chemicals that feed orange microbial mats growing on the rocks at Larsen Spring, one of nine thermal springs in Northern B.C. and the southern Yukon ~ STEVE GRASBY/GSC

Spring water from deep underground carries plenty of heat and chemicals that feed orange microbial mats growing on the rocks at Larsen Spring, one of nine thermal springs in Northern B.C. and the southern Yukon ~ STEVE GRASBY/GSC

VANCOUVER – The water burbles out of the earth carrying evidence of its underground voyage. It has come from depths of up to five kilometres, bringing plenty of heat, gas and chemicals with it.

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Five years, five homes demolished and gas keeps bubbling from the deep Part 2: Trouble Beneath Our Feet – Trying to plug the leak in Calmar, Alberta

Ralph Olson's home beside the leaking well in Calmar, Alta.~ Edmonton Journall photo

Ralph Olson’s home beside the leaking well in Calmar, Alta.~ Edmonton Journall photo

Imperial Oil workers came knocking in Calmar, a small town southwest of Edmonton, looking for old oil and gas wells in 2008. They found one leaking just a metre from the Beaudry home on Evergreen Crescent and took drastic steps to try to stop the gas rising from the deep.

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